Diverse Impact of Homeschooling (Free Sample)

July 25, 2018

Diverse Impact of Homeschooling

Homeschooling means education of children at home conducted by their parents that aim to convey their knowledge to the children the way it is usually done at school. As parents substitute professional teachers in this process, homeschooling becomes a negative educational experience for the children in almost every aspect of their development.

Homeschooling is harmful for children as it only teaches them a single perspective, which is the perspective of their parents and does not expose them to global perspectives. This means that children become able to express ideas their parents have taught them. It does not allow children to grow, have their own thoughts and become creative. It does not allow them to develop a wider perspective, which is crucial while engaging in interaction with different people in different situations.

Socially, homeschooling has an adverse impact on children because it does not allow them to have a chance of communicating and socializing with children from other social groups, ethnic backgrounds and races. By being constantly restrained within the circle of parents and other family members, children tend to lose contact with society since they fail to develop vital skills of communication. In addition to being socially excluded and having a limited perspective on life, they usually lack the ability to cultivate relationships with peers and to handle diverse life situations. Consequently, these children become socially dysfunctional due to the lack of self-esteem and courage that is required for establishing strong social contact.

In addition, homeschooling is unhealthy because it may form depressive tendencies in home-educated children since they often despise themselves because of the absence of friends and an emerging feeling of being unwanted and not needed by others, especially when parents are employed and do not spent a lot of time at home. In such a case children are left at home alone for a long time with no one else to communicate with, except their siblings if they are lucky to have them.  Therefore, if parents opt to educate children at home, at least one parent should stay with them all the time, otherwise, it will make children feel left out. This negatively influences emotional and mental development, which leads to depression, inability to adequately express feelings, and other emotional disorders. Moreover, spending time at home when other children are at school leaves home-schooled children wondering what is wrong with them that they are not allowed to attend a regular school just like other children. The symptoms mentioned above emerge due to the lack of friendly relations among home-educated children that is usually one of the core components of a proper social development.

To sum it all up, homeschooling is a dangerous risk for children, as it negatively influences child’s social, as well as emotional, development because it enables them to relate to people outside their families, a situation that may lead to emergence of the symptoms of depression. Besides, home schooling should not be encouraged since it forms in children a limited and one-sided perspective on life that is similar to one of their parents.

Bibliography

  • Shyers, Larry Edward. “A comparison of social adjustment between home and traditionally schooled students.” Home School Researcher 8, no. 3 (1992): 1-8.
  • Smedley, Thomas. “Socialization of home school children.” Home School Researcher 8, no. 3 (1992): 9-16.
  • West, Robin L. “The Harms of Homeschooling.” Philosophy & Public Policy Quarterly 29, no. 3/4 (2009): 7-12.
  • Robin L. West. “The Harms of Homeschooling.” Philosophy & Public Policy Quarterly 29, no. 3/4 (2009): 9
  • Thomas Smedley. “Socialization of home school children.” Home School Researcher 8, no. 3 (1992): 12
  • Larry Edward Shyers. “A comparison of social adjustment between home and traditionally schooled students.” Home School Researcher 8, no. 3 (1992): 6.
  • Smedley. “Socialization of home school children,” 11.